Innovation

Innovation: Galileo cycle-slip detection

September 1, 2016By and
FIGURE 3.  Statistical and absolute thresholds.

How four frequencies help when the ionosphere is disturbed The authors explore how cycle slips in Galileo carrier-phase measurements can be more effectively detected using four frequencies. MORE SATELLITES OR MORE SIGNALS? That was the question put to the delegates at GNSS Election ’08, the stimulating and amusing entertainment provided at the GPS World Leadership Dinner held in conjunction with The... read more

Innovation: Evolutionary and revolutionary

July 11, 2016By
FIGURE 1.  An extended bandwidth GNSS antenna. The lower and connected dipoles are tuned to L2 and the upper coupled shorted dipoles are tuned to L1. Current flow in the circular waveguide of the GNSS antenna is shown. Strong circumferential currents flow at the top of the waveguide. Red indicates large currents and the arrows show the directions of the current flow.

The development and performance of the VeraPhase GNSS antenna
We take a look at a revolutionary design of a multi-frequency multi-GNSS antenna. Our authors discuss how the antenna evolved from a research project in academia to a commercial product about to enter the market. read more

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Innovation: There’s an app for that

June 13, 2016By
Figure 7. Total electron content in TECu across South America on Feb. 5, 2015, between 19:00 UTC and 19:15 UTC.

Using a smartphone for GNSS ionospheric data collection
In this month’s column, we take a look at the use of a smartphone app to collect GNSS ionospheric data. The authors' app-centric approach provides a software framework and output format that remain the same for different receivers. read more

Innovation: Quo vademus

May 3, 2016By
FIGURE 12. Tightly coupled positioning trajectory for test drive in Braunschweig.

Future automotive GNSS positioning in urban scenarios
Driving in built-up areas, buildings can block the signals from GPS satellites. But if the receiver can access the signals of two or more GNSSs, position fixes might be available where none were possible with GPS alone, and the accuracies of marginal fixes might be improved. The authors look at using multi-GNSS for navigating in the heart of a city and how the additional signals can help us to get where we’re going. read more

Innovation: Flying safe

April 4, 2016By
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GNSS robustness for unmanned aircraft systems
When siting the antenna of a GNSS receiver or designing a GNSS-based navigation system, electromagnetic compatibility is an important concern. This is particularly true for airborne platforms. In this month’s cover story, we take a look at how radio-frequency interference can impact GNSS equipment on unmanned aircraft systems and how robustly the equipment can navigate those systems. read more

Innovation: Clarifying the ambiguities

March 8, 2016By
FIGURE 1. Public providers of PPP-AR products.

Examining the interoperability of precise point positioning products
Our authors look at the interoperability of PPP ambiguity resolution products distributed by several research organizations for improving position solutions. read more

Innovation: Null-steering antennas

February 11, 2016By
FIGURE 1. Geometry of antenna array consisting of seven dual-frequency (L1, L2), dual polarized (RHCP, LHCP) elements arranged on a circular ground plane.

Assessing the performance of multi-antenna interference-rejection techniques
Several factors affect the levels of signal rejection using antenna arrays. Our authors describe experiments to assess the bounds the factors impose on its signal rejection capability. read more

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Innovation: Guidance for road and track

January 14, 2016By
FIGURE 2. SF-PPP solution displayed on a 5-centimeter accurate road infrastructure map, on Dec. 18, 2014.

Real-time single-frequency precise point positioning for cars and trains
In this month’s Innovation column, we bring together, perhaps for the first time, single-frequency and real-time PPP. Our authors describe a series of experiments they have conducted on roadways and a railway achieving sub-meter horizontal positioning at a 95 percent confidence interval. Such accuracies may already be sufficient for freeway lane and railway track guidance. But we might expect even better accuracies in the future. After all, PPP is getting better all the time. read more