About Richard B. Langley

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Richard B. Langley is a professor in the Department of Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) in Fredericton, Canada, where he has been teaching and conducting research since 1981. He has a B.Sc. in applied physics from the University of Waterloo and a Ph.D. in experimental space science from York University, Toronto. He spent two years at MIT as a postdoctoral fellow, researching geodetic applications of lunar laser ranging and VLBI. For work in VLBI, he shared two NASA Group Achievement Awards.

Professor Langley has worked extensively with the Global Positioning System. He has been active in the development of GPS error models since the early 1980s and is a co-author of the venerable “Guide to GPS Positioning” and a columnist and contributing editor of GPS World magazine. His research team is currently working on a number of GPS-related projects, including the study of atmospheric effects on wide-area augmentation systems, the adaptation of techniques for spaceborne GPS, and the development of GPS-based systems for machine control and deformation monitoring. Professor Langley is a collaborator in UNB’s Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network project and is the principal investigator for the GPS instrument on the Canadian CASSIOPE research satellite now in orbit.

Professor Langley is a fellow of The Institute of Navigation (ION), the Royal Institute of Navigation, and the International Association of Geodesy. He shared the ION 2003 Burka Award with Don Kim and received the ION’s Johannes Kepler Award in 2007.

Posts by Richard B. Langley

Innovation: Faster, Higher, Stronger Posted on 08 Oct 2015 in the From the Magazine & GNSS & Innovation categories.

Proposed GNSS Navigation Messages for Improved Performance
In this month’s column, we look at proposed changes to the way navigation messages are formulated that could result in a future satellite navigation system providing faster fixes effectively giving receivers higher sensitivity and stronger performance. Read more»

Latest Galileo Satellites Will Head to Plane A Posted on 10 Sep 2015 in the GNSS & Latest News categories.

I had the honour of the first question at today’s Galileo press conference hosted by the European Space Agency (ESA), and it was about the status of the satellites launched... Read more»

It’s Leap Second Day! Time to Get in Sync Posted on 30 Jun 2015 in the Featured Stories & GNSS & Latest News categories.

“Time waits for no one,” Mick Jagger lamented in song when he turned 30. But tonight, on the evening of June 30, our clocks will stand still for a moment,... Read more»

Orbit of Second Wayward Galileo Satellite Adjusted Posted on 11 Mar 2015 in the GNSS & Latest News categories.

Editor’s Note: See the report from the European Space Agency here. An official with the European Space Agency has confirmed that the sequence of maneuvers to adjust the orbit of... Read more»

Innovation: Python GNSS Receiver Posted on 01 Feb 2015 in the From the Magazine & Innovation & OEM categories.

An Object-Oriented Software Platform Suitable for Multiple Receivers
An experiment highlights the abilities of the Python Receiver, showing how it has been used to develop a software-defined GNSS receiver — one well-suited to processing data from a network of receiver front ends. Read more»

Orbit of One Wayward Galileo Satellite Raised Posted on 01 Dec 2014 in the Featured Stories & GNSS & Latest News categories.

The orbit of one of the two Galileo satellites launched into incorrect orbits on August 22 is being adjusted. Tracking data supplied by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD)... Read more»

Innovation: A Bright Idea Posted on 04 Nov 2014 in the Innovation & OEM categories.

Testing the Feasibility of Positioning Using Ambient Light By Jingbin Liu, Ruizhi Chen, Yuwei Chen, Jian Tang, and Juha Hyyppä AND THEN THERE WAS LIGHT. Well, the whole electromagnetic (EM)... Read more»

Innovation: Scintillating Statistics Posted on 02 Oct 2014 in the From the Magazine & Innovation & OEM categories.

A Look at High-Latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Disturbances of GPS Signals
In an effort to help improve the monitoring, mapping, and modeling of scintillations, a team of researchers led by Prof. Jade Morton is monitoring high-latitude and equatorial scintillations and they discuss some of their preliminary results in this month’s column. Read more»