TAG: Oregon

Oregon moves to tablets for no-stake 3D

February 8, 2017By

The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) is embracing the growing trend in highway construction to go “stakeless” and push to full 3D design. With more contractors using automated machine guidance applications, ODOT’s construction personnel are being asked to inspect projects with fewer stakes and visual indicators for line and grade. Employees are seeking to use the same data and information to... read more

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SOAR Oregon backs UAS FutureFarm for digital agriculture

May 3, 2016By

SOAR Oregon, a non-profit organization focused on the development of the unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) industry in Oregon, has given the city of Pendleton a grant for the establishment of a FutureFarm project at the Pendleton UAS Test Range. The Oregon UAS FutureFarm is a real-world proving ground designed to help digital agriculture pioneers accelerate product development, reduce cycles and... read more

Trimble VRS Now Service Available in Australia, Oregon

March 3, 2015By

Trimble, together with its distribution partner Ultimate Positioning Group, announced the availability of Trimble VRS Now correction service in Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria. Trimble is also now offering the Trimble VRS Now correction service in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. The commercial subscription service provides surveyors, civil engineers, geospatial professionals and other industry specialists in these areas with... read more

On the Edge: Tracking Slips and Creeps: Earthquake Monitoring Gets Substantial Boost from GPS

July 1, 2011By

The Earth’s surface is constantly shifting, being deformed as earthquake faults accumulate strain, and slip or slowly creep over time. Not long ago, scientists relied solely on seismometers to monitor the earth’s movements. Today, GPS has taken prominence as an indispensible tool. PANGA, the monitoring network covering the Pacific Northwest, uses GPS to monitor this movement by measuring the precise position (within 5 millimeters or less) of stations near active faults relative to each other. By determining how the stations have moved, ground deformation can be determined. read more