TAG: NOAA

Blast from Sun Unsettles Earth’s Magnetic Field, but No Storming

January 13, 2014By
Image of the sun on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, from the Solar X-Ray Imager on NOAA's GOES satellite, taken just after the maximum emission of a solar flare. The eruption came from the middle of the sun and is directed toward Earth. This is the largest solar flare so far this year.

Forecasters at NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center said the sun’s coronal mass ejection (CME) that reached Earth on Jan. 9, unsettled the geomagnetic field but did not cause storm conditions to be reached due to the weak magnetic field. While there is still a chance we could see some geomagnetic storming, that threat is greatly diminished. The Space Weather Prediction... read more

The Halloween Storms: When Solar Events Spooked the Skies

October 30, 2013By
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Ten years ago, scientists watching the skies experienced a Halloween fright of cosmic proportions, when space weather degraded GPS signals, affecting land and ocean surveys, and commercial and military aircraft navigation. The most extreme of what became known as the Halloween Storms hit on October 30, 2003 — ten years ago today. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency,... read more

Seven Free Alternatives to OPUS GPS Post-Processing During U.S. Federal Government Shutdown

October 2, 2013By
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On October 1, 2013, the U.S. federal government shut down and furloughed 800,000 non-essential workers. While services considered essential remained active, those considered non-essential services, like the National Geodetic Survey’s Online Positioning User Service (OPUS), were shutdown. OPUS is a free, online GPS post-processing service. If you try to access www.ngs.noaa.gov, the following screen will be displayed: For those of... read more

Innovation: The Distress Alerting Satellite System

January 1, 2011By
Cospas–Sarsat system.

Taking the Search out of Search and Rescue
In 1997, a Canadian government study determined that an improved search and rescue system would be one based on medium-Earth orbit satellites, which can provide full global coverage, can determine beacon location, and would need fewer ground stations. This month’s column examines the architecture of the GPS-based Distress Alerting Satellite System and takes a look at early test results. read more