TAG: NOAA

GPS data release to boost space-weather science

January 30, 2017By
An image illustrating the six orbital planes in which GPS satellites (“navigational satellites,” or ns) fly around Earth. This configuration shows the orbits just before the start of this solar cycle’s biggest geomagnetic storm, which occurred on March 17, 2015. The darkest orbital lines indicate the position of the satellites in that moment; the lightest lines indicate where they were 12 hours prior.
(Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory)

Today, more than 16 years of space-weather data is publicly available for the first time in history. The data comes from space-weather sensors on board the nation’s GPS satellites. The newly available data gives researchers a treasure trove of measurements they can use to better understand how space weather works and how best to protect critical infrastructure, such as the... read more

Coyote howls into the wind

February 15, 2016By
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A team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Raytheon has successfully demonstrated advancements of the Coyote Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), verifying new technology that improves Coyote’s ability to collect vital weather data on hurricanes. read more

This article is tagged with , , , , , and posted in Featured Stories, From the Magazine, UAV/UGV

Highest Peak in North America to be Surveyed

June 16, 2015By
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A new GPS survey of Mount McKinley, the highest point in North America, will update the commonly accepted elevation of McKinley’s peak, 20,320 feet. The last survey was completed in 1953. The USGS, along with NOAA’s National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), are supporting a GPS survey of the Mount McKinley apex. Surveying technology and processes... read more

Down in the Flood with GPS

March 31, 2015By

Surveyors, prepare to get your feet wet. Global warming is about to hit you in the job list. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year. This according to a December report in Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. read more

Severe Weather Study Shows Potential of GNSS-RO Satellites

January 11, 2015By
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GeoOptics, a satellite-based environmental data services company, in cooperation with Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER), an environmental research and development company, has announced the initial results of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) showing the reliability of radio occultation data in improving predictions of severe weather and flash flood events. read more

Blast from Sun Unsettles Earth’s Magnetic Field, but No Storming

January 13, 2014By
Image of the sun on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, from the Solar X-Ray Imager on NOAA's GOES satellite, taken just after the maximum emission of a solar flare. The eruption came from the middle of the sun and is directed toward Earth. This is the largest solar flare so far this year.

Forecasters at NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center said the sun’s coronal mass ejection (CME) that reached Earth on Jan. 9, unsettled the geomagnetic field but did not cause storm conditions to be reached due to the weak magnetic field. While there is still a chance we could see some geomagnetic storming, that threat is greatly diminished. The Space Weather Prediction... read more

The Halloween Storms: When Solar Events Spooked the Skies

October 30, 2013By
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Ten years ago, scientists watching the skies experienced a Halloween fright of cosmic proportions, when space weather degraded GPS signals, affecting land and ocean surveys, and commercial and military aircraft navigation. The most extreme of what became known as the Halloween Storms hit on October 30, 2003 — ten years ago today. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency,... read more

Seven Free Alternatives to OPUS GPS Post-Processing During U.S. Federal Government Shutdown

October 2, 2013By
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On October 1, 2013, the U.S. federal government shut down and furloughed 800,000 non-essential workers. While services considered essential remained active, those considered non-essential services, like the National Geodetic Survey’s Online Positioning User Service (OPUS), were shutdown. OPUS is a free, online GPS post-processing service. If you try to access www.ngs.noaa.gov, the following screen will be displayed: For those of... read more