TAG: history

Expert Advice: Looking Back to the Early Days of GPS

September 1, 2013By

By Len Jacobson Besides my family and friends, two major influences have guided my life. One is GPS, and the other is flying, although I’m not a pilot. Most of the flying was on business trips for GPS. I’ve been writing a book about my experiences and how I helped in a small way to bring GPS to the world.... read more

Early Days: The very first GPS brochure ever published, accompanied by a memoir of those times.

September 1, 2010By

The first time I ever heard of the Magnavox Research Laboratory in Torrance, California, was in 1966, as a young engineer working at Hughes Aircraft. We were building large (46-foot diameter) ground stations for the Defense Satellite Communications System (DSCS). Magnavox was supplying the secret anti-jam modems used in the terminals. read more

This article is tagged with , and posted in Aviation & Space, Warfighter

Letters to the Editor

July 1, 2010By

Our readers respond to the cover features in the May and June issues: the two-part special the "Origins of GPS" and Richard Langley's look at "GPS by the Numbers." read more

This article is tagged with and posted in From the Editor

Part 2: The Origins of GPS, Fighting to Survive

June 1, 2010By
At the JPO. Frank Butterfield of Aerospace, Col. Parkinson, and Cdr. Bill Huston, deputy JPO director from the U.S. Navy,
in the early 1970s. A model of a Phase I GPS satellite stands on the table between the latter two.

GPS Phase I program approval meant that the real work could begin. The conclusion of a two-part history, told by the people who made it. read more

Part 1: The Origins of GPS, and the Pioneers Who Launched the System

May 1, 2010By
Mathematician Bill Guier (l) and physicist George Weiffenbach (r), told APL Research Center director Frank T. McClure (c), about their success using Doppler tracking for satellites. “McClure’s brain started going into fast forward,” remembered John Dassoulas. “Knowing the navigational challenges the U.S. Navy faced, McClure said, ‘Well, if you can find out where the satellite is, you ought to be able to turn that problem upside down and find out where you are.’ “

The original system study, the key innovations, and the forgotten heroes of the world’s first — and still greatest — global navigation satellite system. True history, told by the people who made it. Part One of a Two-Part Special Feature. read more