GSAT-10 Satellite Placed in Geosynchronous Orbit

October 8, 2012  - By

The Indian Space Research Organization has announced that the orbit-raising maneuvers of GSAT-10 satellite have been successfully completed from ISRO’s Master Control Facility, Hassan. GSAT-10 was launched September 30. The third and final orbit-raising maneuvers was performed October 3 to place the GSAT-10 in an orbit with 35,734 km apogee (farthest point to earth), 35,585 km perigee (nearest point to earth), and an inclination of 0.172 degree with respect to the equator. Currently, the orbital period of GSAT-10 is 23 hours 50 minutes.

According to the announcement from the Indian Space Research Organization, the two solar panels and the two dual gridded reflector antennas were also deployed later in the day. Currently, the satellite is in final orbital configuration at 70.18 degree East longitude. In the coming days, the satellite will be moved towards its designated location of 83 degree East and in-orbit testing of its communication and navigations payloads will be performed.

As is often the case, NORAD/JSpOC has temporarily “lost” the satellite following one of its orbital maneuvers. The last published two-line orbital element set for the satellite is dated September 30.

This article is tagged with and posted in Augmentation & Assistance, Mapping, Transportation News
Eric Gakstatter

About the Author:

Eric Gakstatter has been involved in the GPS/GNSS industry for more than 20 years. For 10 years, he held several product management positions in the GPS/GNSS industry, managing the development of several medium- and high-precision GNSS products along with associated data-collection and post-processing software. Since 2000, he's been a power user of GPS/GNSS technology as well as consulted with capital management companies; federal, state and local government agencies; and private companies on the application and/or development of GPS technology. Since 2006, he's been a contributing editor to GPS World magazine,writing a monthly newsletter on high-precision GPS/GNSS technology. He is also editor of Geospatial Solutions, a weekly newsletter focused on geospatial technologies.

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