GPS Block IIF-4 Launch Set for Today

May 7, 2013  - By 0 Comments

News courtesy of CANSPACE Listerv.

Update: The launch window for the liftoff has been adjusted slightly to  21:38-21:56 UTC.

The United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas 5 rocket’s rollout to the pad  took place Tuesday. Weather forecasters have predicted an 80
percent chance of favorable conditions for launch.

Updates on the mission and live video coverage of the launch is available.

Live video will also be available here and on this satellite feed (for those of you still with backyard dishes): SES 2, Transp. 21, C-band, 87° West

ULA is also posting to Facebook and tweeting to Twitter at twitter.com/ulalaunch; look for the #GPSIIF-4 hashtag.


The next GPS satellite launch is scheduled for May 15 with the launch window extending from 21:39 to 21:58 UTC. An Atlas 5 rocket will be used to place the satellite, GPS IIF-4, into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

This is the first time in almost 28 years that an Atlas rocket will be used to launch a GPS satellite. All of the prototype or Block I satellites were orbited with Atlas rockets. Since then, Delta rockets have been used exclusively for GPS launches. The IIF satellites are being launched with a mixture of Atlas and Delta rockets.

The IIF-4 satellite, also known as SVN66, will operate as PRN27. SVN66/PRN27 will eventually occupy the C-2 slot, replacing SVN33/PRN03, a Block IIA satellite launched in 1996. Reportedly, SVN66/PRN27 will go through an extended period of testing following launch, and is not expected to be set healthy until August. SVN33 will become a reserve or backup satellite.

Ground Stations: ER = Eastern Range; BOSS = Call sign of New Hampshire   Station, New Boston Air Force Station, New Hampshire; LION = call sign   of Telemetry & Command Station, Royal Air Force Oakhanger, Hampshire,   U.K.; Diego Garcia = Diego Garcia Station (call sign REEF), British   Indian Ocean Territory; Guam = Guam Tracking Station (call sign GUAM),   Dededo, Guam. TDRS: Tracking and Data Relay Satellite MES1: Centaur first main engine start MECO1: Centaur first main engine cutoff MES2: Centaur second main engine start MECO2: Centaur second main engine cutoff At spacecraft separation, the GPS satellite's orbit will be circular   with a height of 11,047 nautical miles or 20,459 kilometers and an   inclination of 55 degrees.

Ground Stations: ER = Eastern Range; BOSS = Call sign of New Hampshire Station, New Boston Air Force Station, New Hampshire; LION = call sign of Telemetry & Command Station, Royal Air Force Oakhanger, Hampshire, U.K.; Diego Garcia = Diego Garcia Station (call sign REEF), British Indian Ocean Territory; Guam = Guam Tracking Station (call sign GUAM), Dededo, Guam.
TDRS: Tracking and Data Relay Satellite
MES1: Centaur first main engine start
MECO1: Centaur first main engine cutoff
MES2: Centaur second main engine start
MECO2: Centaur second main engine cutoff
At spacecraft separation, the GPS satellite’s orbit will be circular with a height of 11,047 nautical miles or 20,459 kilometers and an inclination of 55 degrees.

(Courtesy of SpaceFlight Now) This is the 45th Launch Support Squadron crew patch for the GPS 2F-4   mission, which is Boeing's Space Vehicle (SV) #5. Each SV is a named   for a navigation star and its constellation. SV-5 is named Vega, with   constellation Lyra. On the patch, they are the large star and   constellation in the background of space. The United Launch Alliance   Atlas 5 rocket is shown lifting the satellite from the Eastern Launch   Site at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Squadron mascot is a   gator, and a lyra is a Greek harp. SSgt Thomas Hogan drew a   "Toga-Gator" and Lt Ken Stuart did the patch design.

(Courtesy of SpaceFlight Now) This is the 45th Launch Support Squadron crew patch for the GPS 2F-4 mission, which is Boeing’s Space Vehicle (SV) #5. Each SV is a named for a navigation star and its constellation. SV-5 is named Vega, with constellation Lyra. On the patch, they are the large star and constellation in the background of space. The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket is shown lifting the satellite from the Eastern Launch Site at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Squadron mascot is a gator, and a lyra is a Greek harp. SSgt Thomas Hogan drew a “Toga-Gator” and Lt Ken Stuart did the patch design.

 

GPS World staff

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