CoreLogic: Top 25 Zip Codes in NYC at Risk of Property Damage from Hurricane Sandy

October 29, 2012  - By


Note to Readers: The CoreLogic storm-surge analysis provided below was developed based on the projected path of Hurricane Sandy as of 12:30 p.m. ET Monday, October 29.

CoreLogic has released data showing the top 25 zip codes in New York City-Northern New Jersey-Long Island that are at risk of exposure to residential property damage from hurricane-driven storm-surge flooding when Hurricane Sandy hits the Atlantic coast later today. Massapequa, located on the South Shore of Long Island, holds the top spot with more than $4.6 billion in total structure value at risk.

In a report issued Saturday, CoreLogic also provided an estimate of the total number of residential properties at risk among the coastal Mid-Atlantic states, assuming Sandy hits the coast as a Category 1 hurricane. Within that seven-state region, nearly 284,000 total residential properties valued at almost $88 billion stand at risk:

According to CoreLogic, the number of residential properties in eight major metro areas and their respective potential exposure to damage are as follows:

CoreLogic reports that hurricane-driven storm-surge flooding can cause significant property damage when high winds and low pressure causes water to amass inside the storm, releasing a powerful rush over land when the hurricane moves on shore. The CoreLogic analysis measures damage from storm surge and does not include potential damage from wind and rain associated with hurricanes.

To view a map showing hurricane-driven storm-surge risk through Google Earth, visit here. To download the map as a KML file, visit here. Static maps depicting storm surge in the Northeast are available upon request.

For more information on CoreLogic storm-surge methodology, data and analysis, download a copy of the more in-depth 2012 CoreLogic Storm Surge report at

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Eric Gakstatter

About the Author:

Eric Gakstatter has been involved in the GPS/GNSS industry for more than 20 years. For 10 years, he held several product management positions in the GPS/GNSS industry, managing the development of several medium- and high-precision GNSS products along with associated data-collection and post-processing software. Since 2000, he's been a power user of GPS/GNSS technology as well as consulted with capital management companies; federal, state and local government agencies; and private companies on the application and/or development of GPS technology. Since 2006, he's been a contributor to GPS World magazine, serving as editor of the monthly Survey Scene newsletter until 2015, and as editor of Geospatial Solutions monthly newsletter for GPS World's sister site Geospatial Solutions, which focuses on GIS and geospatial technologies.

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