Signal Processing

Signal Decoding with Conventional Receiver and Antenna

February 1, 2013By
Figure 7  Signal-to-noise-density ratio of E1 (red), E5a (magenta), E5b (blue), and E6 (green) code tracking of Galileo IOV satellite PRN 11 on December 21–22, 2012.

A method of decoding an unknown pseudorandom noise code uses a conventional GNSS antenna and receiver with modified firmware. The method was verified using the signals from the Galileo In-Orbit Validation satellites. read more

Call for Participation: Round 2 of NGS Kinematic GPS Challenge

January 30, 2013By

NOAA’s National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is conducting a 12-year project, called Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D), to redefine the vertical datum of the United States by flying airborne gravity missions. The accuracy of the resulting vertical datum depends directly on the quality of the aircraft’s GNSS position solutions. In August 2010, NGS issued a Kinematic... read more

This article is tagged with and posted in Aviation, GNSS News, Latest News, Signal Processing, Transportation News

Septentrio Demonstrates BeiDou+GPS+GLONASS Positioning

January 9, 2013By
Septentrio_Op

Septentrio announced on January 7 that it has successfully implemented BeiDou support in the company’s high-precision receiver software, taking advantage of the recent official release of BeiDou’s Interface Control Document (ICD) to including the Chinese satellite navigation signals into its position-velocity-time (PVT) solution. According to the Belgian GNSS receiver manufacturer, its engineers “are currently processing further data sets to finalize... read more

JAVAD GNSS Tracks Compass B3 Signals

January 9, 2013By

On December 29, two days after the Compass Interface Control Document (ICD) was made publicly available, JAVAD GNSS announced that it had tracked “B3 signal from all launched Compass satellites, using TRE-G3T-E E6-band capable receiver.  Graphs shows SNR and ‘code-minus-phase’ combination of GEO svn #5 (sat #215 on graph), IGSO svn #8 (sat #218) and MEO svn #14 (sat #224).... read more

This article is tagged with and posted in BeiDou/Compass, GNSS, Latest News, Signal Processing

Galileo E6 Signal Tracking Announced by JAVAD GNSS

January 2, 2013By

An announcement on the JAVAD GNSS website states “On December 21, 2012, we have tracked E6 B/C signal from all launched Galileo satellites, using TRE-G3T-E E6-band capable receiver. “The following graphs shows SNR and ‘code-minus-phase’ combination of svn #11 (sat #81 on graph), svn #12 (sat #82) , svn #19 (sat #89) and svn #20 (sat #90). C/A stands for... read more

This article is tagged with , and posted in Galileo, GNSS, GNSS News, Signal Processing

Galileo and Compass: A Tale of Also-Runnings

December 19, 2012By

Beating up the backstretch neck and neck, tied for third in the GNSS race, Galileo and Compass today offer some signals and some satellites to GNSS users — as long as those users are researchers. Galileo has more going for it in the way of signals, while Compass holds an edge in the number of satellites. Without an interface control... read more

Directions 2013: Doing More with Less to Advance GNSS

December 1, 2012By

The history of GNSS shows each year has always been more successful than the year prior, and in 2013 we expect the trend to continue. In the United States, the role of GPS will continue to expand, and the applications for our technology will reach sectors we never imagined. As our international partner countries continue to launch GNSS satellites, and user equipment develops further, our community will increase its globalization, and international cooperation will reach new heights. read more

Directions 2013: Dealing with Interference

December 1, 2012By

In my vision of the future of GNSS, I see a pressing need to manage radio-frequency spectrum more efficiently. This will drive the creation of official standards for GNSS receivers, and better design of those receivers with better filters at lower cost, to protect against out-of-band and near-band interference. This in turn will enable user to undertake widespread monitoring and reporting of in-band interference, and create the freedom for many technologies to explore wider and more productive use of all bands of the radio-frequency spectrum. read more

This article is tagged with , and posted in From the Magazine, GNSS Opinions, Signal Processing