GNSS Opinions

New Organization Advocates for GPS Industry

February 25, 2013By

A new group, the GPS Innovation Alliance, has formed and announced itself as the voice of the U.S. GPS industry and community of users, to “support the ever-increasing importance of GPS” in the U.S. capital, Washington, D.C.  The organization subsumes and replaces both the U.S. GPS Industry Council, an entity of longstanding, and the Coalition to Save Our GPS, which... read more

Expert Advice: BeiDou, How Things Have Changed

February 1, 2013By

Economically, the System Differs Significantly from Its GNSS Cousins John W. Lavrakas In May 2007, I authored an article in GPS World looking ten years into the future and envisioning how the GNSS field would operate at that then-distant time. Reviewing my assessments, I see that I was both accurate and wide of the mark with my predictions. The prediction... read more

Report from ION ITM: Faster, Smaller, Cheaper

January 29, 2013By

And more of them! That’s been one of the mantras — a controversial one, granted — of technological advance in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. It has succeeded in penetrating the global positioning, navigation, and timing vanguard, as evidenced by a handful of key presentations on the first day of the Institute of Navigation (ION) International Technical Meeting... read more

High-Level Perspective on PNT Frontiers

January 1, 2013By

New Technology, New Applications, New Science from the Stanford Symposium By James D. Litton The sixth annual Stanford PNT Symposium in November brought together a select group of experts to share insights from the latest research, developments, and proposals, GNSS and non-GNSS, that show promise for the international community. Among other noteworthy presentations, we heard Brad Parkinson’s suggested incremental system... read more

Galileo and Compass: A Tale of Also-Runnings

December 19, 2012By

Beating up the backstretch neck and neck, tied for third in the GNSS race, Galileo and Compass today offer some signals and some satellites to GNSS users — as long as those users are researchers. Galileo has more going for it in the way of signals, while Compass holds an edge in the number of satellites. Without an interface control... read more

Directions 2013: Doing More with Less to Advance GNSS

December 1, 2012By

The history of GNSS shows each year has always been more successful than the year prior, and in 2013 we expect the trend to continue. In the United States, the role of GPS will continue to expand, and the applications for our technology will reach sectors we never imagined. As our international partner countries continue to launch GNSS satellites, and user equipment develops further, our community will increase its globalization, and international cooperation will reach new heights. read more

Directions 2013: Dealing with Interference

December 1, 2012By

In my vision of the future of GNSS, I see a pressing need to manage radio-frequency spectrum more efficiently. This will drive the creation of official standards for GNSS receivers, and better design of those receivers with better filters at lower cost, to protect against out-of-band and near-band interference. This in turn will enable user to undertake widespread monitoring and reporting of in-band interference, and create the freedom for many technologies to explore wider and more productive use of all bands of the radio-frequency spectrum. read more

This article is tagged with , and posted in From the Magazine, GNSS Opinions, Signal Processing

Directions 2013: Galileo and GNSS to the Fore

December 1, 2012By
Figure 4. Real-time sensor station network.

The European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany operates spacecraft on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA) and maintains the ground facilities and expertise for ESA and other institutional and commercial customers. ESOC is composed of two departments: the Mission Operations Department and the Ground Systems Engineering Department, of which the Navigation Support Office is an integral part. The main objectives of the Navigation Support Office (NSO)are the provision of expertise for high-accuracy navigation, satellite geodesy, and the generation of related products and services for all ESA missions and for third-party customers, as well as supporting the European GNSS Programmes: Galileo and EGNOS. read more