Canadian Science Minister Announces Grant to Langley’s UNB Lab

August 26, 2014  - By 0 Comments
Professor Langley (center) discusses the UNB geodesy program with Canadian Science Minister Ed Holder (second from left.)

Professor Langley (fourth from left) discusses the UNB geodesy program with Canadian Science Minister Ed Holder (third from left.)

The Canadian Minister of State for science and technology, Ed Holder, visited the University of New Brunswick on July 28 to announce the awarding by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of $2.4 million to 28 UNB researchers.

He was joined by Keith Ashfield, member of Parliament for Fredericton, where UNB is based, and Craig Leonard, the New Brunswick Minister of Energy and Mines.

A highlight of the visit was a tour of the Department of Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering to see the work of Prof. Richard Langley and his students. Langley received $170,000 in Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) funding in the competition. The funding will support the work of his group in improving augmented multi-constellation satellite-based precise positioning in a wide range of environments. Langley is GPS World’s Innovation editor, a post he has held since the magazine’s inception.

Canadian Science Minister Ed Holder looks at GPS World magazine, which has featured Innovation columns edited by Richard Langley for more than two decades.

Canadian Science Minister Ed Holder looks at GPS World magazine, which has featured Innovation columns edited by Richard Langley for more than two decades.

Although GPS was the first widely available satellite navigation system, it has now been joined by the Russian GLONASS system, and will soon be accompanied by the European Galileo system, the Chinese BeiDou system, and the Japanese QZSS — all of which have test satellites now in orbit. There are interesting problems to be solved in gaining maximum benefits from this plethora of GNSS for precise positioning and navigation, and Langley and his team will address a number of them.

The team is also involved in the analysis of data from the GPS-based instrument on the Canadian CASSIOPE scientific satellite launched at the end of September 2013. The instrument, which precisely determines the position of the satellite and provides information on the state of the Earth’s ionosphere, was designed at UNB.

The NSERC Discovery Grants Program is an integral component of the government’s efforts to develop, attract and retain the world’s most talented researchers at Canadian universities. The program funds discovery research in a multitude of scientific and engineering disciplines, which builds a broad base of research capacity across the country.

Professor Langley gave the following presentation at the NSERC Discovery Grants Scholarships Rollout Announcement at UNB on July 28:

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