Archives

Mission Accomplished for Galileo’s Pathfinder GIOVE-A

July 3, 2012 - By

Artist’s impression of GIOVE-A in orbit. (Photo by ESA – P. Carril) With the initial satellites of the Galileo constellation working well in orbit, it has been decided to end the mission of ESA’s pioneering GIOVE-A navigation satellite, reports the European Space Agency. Launched on December 28, 2005, this first experimental satellite performed the vital task of securing the radio... read more

This article is tagged with , and posted in Galileo, GNSS, Latest News

The System: British Patent Filings Threaten GPS III and Galileo Progress

July 1, 2012 - By

Two British technologists backed by the U.K. Ministry of Defense have filed patents on the future interoperable GPS and Galileo signal designs that severely disrupt modernization plans for both systems and suddenly, unexpectedly place receiver manufacturers in a highly uncertain and unfavorable situation. Some of the patents have been granted in the U.K. and in Europe, and applications are pending... read more

This article is tagged with , , , , and posted in Galileo, GNSS, GPS Modernization, The System

The Business — July 2012

July 1, 2012 - By

Download the PDF. read more

This article is tagged with and posted in System and Business News, The Business

Real-Time Extended GNSS Positioning: A New Generation of Centimeter-Accurate Networks

July 1, 2012 - By

A new method brings together advantages of real-time kinematic (RTK) and precise point positioning (PPP) in a technique that does not require local reference stations, while still providing the the high productivity and accuracy of RTK systems with the extended coverage area of solutions based on global satellite corrections. The real-time centimeter-level accuracy without reference-station infrastructure is suitable for many market segments — and is applicable to multi-GNSS constellations. read more

Expert Advice: Mobile Computing on the Rise

July 1, 2012 - By

This discussion of current trends in location-enabled mobile devices takes as its foundation the different operating systems (OSs) for those devices. Why? For GPS/GNSS hardware units to be useful, there have to be software applications — apps — also riding on those units. Apps are totally dependent on the operating system. An analogy is that the operating system is the foundation of a house and the app is the house itself. The type of foundation you have drives what type of house you can build. read more

This article is tagged with and posted in Expert Advice & Leadership Talks, Opinions, Survey, Survey, Survey Scene, Surveying

Out in Front: The Quick Quid

July 1, 2012 - By

Maybe we should take it as validation, an acknowledgment of the worth, maturity, and promise of the GNSS industry, that profiteers show up trying to make a fast buck. A prompt pound, a quick quid. Or perhaps we should be angry at this violation of international trust, this grasping effort to monetize the free and open exchange of scientific ideas, this contravention of the very spirit and tradition of global navigation satellite systems and signals. read more

This article is tagged with and posted in From the Editor, GNSS, GNSS Opinions, Opinions

Innovation: The Devil Is in the Details

July 1, 2012 - By

Looking Closely at Received GPS Carrier Phase
The stability of a received GPS signal determines how well the receiver can track the signal and the accuracy of the positioning results it provides. While the satellites use a very stable oscillator and modulation system to generate their signals, just how stable are the resulting phase-modulated carriers? In particular, do received signals always conform to the published system specifications? In this month’s column we take a look at a specially designed receiver for analyzing GPS carrier phase and some of the interesting results that have been obtained. read more

This article is tagged with and posted in From the Magazine, GNSS, Innovation, Signal Processing

On the Edge: Sensing the Rivers

July 1, 2012 - By

A fleet of 100 robots equipped with GPS and sensors were released May 9 into California rivers to measure water flow, salinty levels, and pollution. The Floating Sensor Network is a project by the University of California, Berkeley, to improve the way water quality and flows are monitored. About two-thirds of California’s fresh water is in the Sacramento-San Joaquin river system where the test took place. This water supplies about two-thirds of the state’s population with drinking water and irrigation. The initiative is led by associate professor Alexandre Bayen at the Center for Informatin Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS). read more

This article is tagged with and posted in Mapping, Natural Resources, Surveying